2019 – The Year in Review – Top Albums & Songs

Yes, I managed to listen to over 120 albums in 2019. Streaming music subscription services can be a wonderful thing (for consumers, at least). Believe it or not, I still actually purchase music in physical formats, as well.  At any rate, distilling those 120+ albums down to a serviceable “list” of favorites was no mean feat. Behold, my Top Albums of 2019:

15 Peter Caws

15. Peter Caws & Parkington Sisters – The Book of Hylas

Sometimes, through weariness or discouragement, no new thing arises.
Sometimes, through pressure and anxiety, many old things overwhelm.
Learn to wait, for the stirring or for the subsiding.
Learn to wait, for the turmoil to be still, for the stillness to speak.
Let memory recall times of taking refuge, times of setting forth anew.
Bring to mind times of comfort or times of purpose.
You have passed this way before.
You have left markers along the way – look for them.

Peter Caws is University Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at The George Washington University. Fun fact: he is the father of Nada Surf’s Matthew Caws. The Book of Hylas is a set of meditations on life and how to live it, recited by the elder Caws, and set to music by Boston-based Parkington Sisters. Clocking in at 13 minutes, this is surely the shortest “album” I have ever short-listed for a Year In Review.

14 Vampire Weekend

14. Vampire Weekend – Father of the Bride

Baby, I know pain is as natural as the rain
I just thought it didn’t rain in California

After a lengthy six year gap, Vampire Weekend returned with their long-awaited fourth LP, Father of the Bride. P4K says it showcases them embracing a full-on jam band vibe. I can’t disagree. Plenty of hooks and ear-worms are here to be pulled out of context, but the album works quite well as a whole. At once cheerful and lamentable.

13 The Get Up Kids

13. The Get Up Kids – Problems

It’s not about hopeless
Not a song of despair
Just about choices and making them fair

Their first album in 8 years, and second since “breaking up” in 2005 and then reforming in 2008, Problems finds The Get Up Kids right back at the height of their considerable powers. They haven’t lost the energy and creativity, although they may have lost one member. Another album that benefits from being experienced whole.

12 Sharon Van Etten

12. Sharon Van Etten – Remind Me Tomorrow

Turning the wheel on my street
My heart still skips a beat

Sharon Van Etten has long been a hardworking supporting act and a talented and proficient solo artist. With Remind Me Tomorrow, she embraces a much broader palette than she employed in the past with her singer-songwriter chops. Production values are up, nostalgia and retro-electronic flourishes feature heavily, and her songwriting is ornamented and adorned in ways both unexpected and refreshing.

11 Bon Iver

11. Bon Iver – i,i

When we were children we were hell bent
Or oblivious at least
But now it comes to mind, we are terrified
So we run and hide for a verified little peace

Bon Iver has always been a superbly singular artist and his falsetto-whisper-croon lilt delivery a vehicle for inscrutable pathos and lonesome heartache. Justin Vernon has worked with some of the industry’s biggest names and yet has managed to carve a channel all his own. i,i in many ways feels like the natural continuation of his sonic odyssey, thus far. Lush and idiosyncratic, this is another album that benefits from whole immersion.

10 Angel Olsen

10. Angel Olsen – All Mirrors

You know best, don’t you, now?
Don’t you, now? Don’t you, now?

Angel Olsen’s sweeping epic All Mirrors has aplomb and grandeur aplenty. Widescreen cinema balladry. Olsen delivers the goods.

9 Efterklang

9. Efterklang – Altid Sammen

My soul in that case, at times
Min sjæl i det bIå, til tider

We are in love now, we are in love
Vi er forelsket nu,  vi er forelsket

Always us, together to share us
Altid os, sammen om at dele os

We are infinite
Vi er uendelig

The Danish outfit’s fifth proper album, the first in seven years, is an ornate and densely-layered work. Altid Sammen (meaning “always together”) is replete with orchestral arrangements and exiguous sonic experimentation. The album is sonorous and rewards total immersion. The vocals are entirely in Danish. I have no idea what they’re singing about.

8 Nick Cave

8. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds – Ghosteen

And if we rise my love
Before the daylight comes
A thousand galleon ships will sail
Ghostly around the morning sun

Without a doubt the most emotionally gut-wrenching release of the year. A 2xLP exegesis on grief and mortality. Nick Cave’s most personal work, ever. Simply devastating.

7 Bibio

7. Bibio – Ribbons

Pretty ribbons
And lovely flowers

Stephen Wilkinson is back with his signature blend of acoustic instrumentation and digital warble, creating arrangements in much the same fashion I imagine a skilled florist does. Exceedingly chill and carefree, Ribbons is an album that practically begs to be the soundtrack to your next nature hike.

6 Mountain Goats

6. The Mountain Goats – In League with Dragons

I’m gonna burn it all down today
And sweep all the ashes away

The Mountain Goats play D&D. That’s it. That’s the review.

5 Townes Van Zandt

5. Townes Van Zandt – Sky Blue

Oh but when good times
Come fallin’ over me
Breath turns to melody
All I need’s gonna fall
Away like dreams

A collection of new material, old material, and a few covers originally recorded with Bill Hedgepeth in 1973, Sky Blue is a welcome addition to the prolific troubadour’s back catalogue. An artist I first came to hear and revere by way of T Bone Burnett and the Coen Brothers, Townes Van Zandt remains a legend of American Country Western music. His writing is poetry that exists on another plane of existence, and yet remains as weary and grizzled as the most down-to-earth Texas troubadour, busking his way across the American Southwest.

4 Big Thief UFOF

4. Big Thief – U.F.O.F.

And you don’t need to know why when you cry
You don’t need to know why
You don’t need to know why when you cry

The first of two albums they would release in 2019, U.F.O.F. finds Adrienne Lenker not letting off the gas, ever traveling forward. This album was recorded in a large, cabin-like room. This is a band to watch over… watch over and marvel.

3 Bombadil

3. Bombadil – Beautiful Country

Suzy don’t forget
Forget to move on

Bombadil have previously featured on my Year in Review lists on more than a few occasions. This year they dropped a brand spanking new album without too much fanfare. It’s exquisite. By degrees, the band is leaving the boondocks behind.

2 Big Thief Two Hands

2. Big Thief – Two Hands

It’s not the room
Not beginning
Not the crowd
Not winning
Not the planet
That’s spinning

Well, darn. Big Thief released two magnum opus records in 2019. I will not be sorry for including both of them on my list, here. Jesus Christ how do they do it?

1 Jeffrey Lewis

1. Jeffrey Lewis & The Voltage – Bad Wiring

Were you going somewhere sooner or later
Or just pushing all the buttons on the elevator
You gotta’ have free will to live your pre-planned life
You gotta’ pay the bill or you get unsubscribed

Admittedly, I had no idea that this was going to be my favorite record of the year. But it is. And I have absolutely no reservations about saying so. Jeffrey Lewis has long been a musician I follow. He’s… what do you want to call it, “Anti-Folk” or some such? His songwriting is biting and incisive, the auditory equivalent of an erudite Reddit thread piercing your brain. He’s done entire albums covering obscure punk rock bands, also entire records covering Jewish counterculture poets, and don’t forget the songs about LSD and sexual legends of the Chelsea Hotel. He’s very much borne of a New York City mythology spanning decades including the years when I am not yet alive. The existential pathos of his work cannot be replicated. This album is like a Rick & Morty episode that flies above the heads of the show’s misogynistic fanbase and yet they still applaud. Brutal, crushing, existential self-awareness seems to be a hallmark of Lewis’ work.

Well I guess we’re not supposed to be wise
If everything that learns also dies

Honorable Mentions: Andrew Bird, Kevin Morby, Bruce Springsteen, Angelo de Augustine, Jessica Pratt, Weyes Blood, Jade Bird, HEALTH, FKA Twigs, Whitney, Holly Herndon, American Football, Lana Del Rey, Why?, Over the Rhine, Pedro the Lion, Helado Negro, Clairo, Josh Ritter, Purple Mountains, Vagabon, Ssion, Chromatics, and Beirut.

Apple Music Playlists:

Top of 2019 – Albums

Top of 2019 – Top Songs

Complete List of 2019 Albums:

  1. !!! – Wallop
  2. A.A. Bondy – Enderness
  3. American Football: American Football (LP3)
  4. Andrew Bird –  My Finest Work Yet
  5. Andy Stott – It Should Be Us
  6. Anemone – Beat My Distance
  7. Angel Olsen – All Mirrors
  8. Angelo de Augustine – Tomb
  9. Apparat – LP5
  10. Bat for Lashes – Lost Girls
  11. Battles – Juice B Crypts
  12. Beirut – Gallipoli
  13. Beth Gibbons, The Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra & Krzysztof Penderecki – Henryk Górecki: Symphony No. 3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs)
  14. Bibio – Ribbons
  15. Big Thief – Two Hands
  16. Big Thief – U.F.O.F.
  17. Bill Evans – Smile With Your Heart: The Best of Bill Evans on Resonance Records
  18. Bombadil – Beautiful Country
  19. Bon Iver – i,i
  20. Bonobo – fabric presents Bonobo
  21. Bruce Springsteen – Western Stars
  22. Cate Le Bon – Reward

  23. CHAI – PUNK
  24. Cherry Glazerr – Stuffed & Ready
  25. Chromatics – Closer to Grey
  26. Ciara – Beauty Marks
  27. The Cinematic Orchestra – To Believe
  28. Clairo – Immunity
  29. Com Truise – Persuasion System
  30. Danger – Origins
  31. Deerhunter – Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared?
  32. Drugdealer – Raw Honey
  33. Ernest Hood – Neighborhoods (Reissue)
  34. Efterklang – Altid Sammen
  35. Ex:Re – Ex:Re
  36. Faye Webster – Atlanta Millionaire’s Club
  37. Fennesz – Agora
  38. Fever Ray – Live at Troxy
  39. FKA Twigs – MAGDALENE
  40. Floating Points – Crush
  41. Floating Points – Late Night Tales: Floating Points
  42. Flying Lotus – Flamagra
  43. George Winston – Restless Wind
  44. The Get Up Kids – Problems
  45. Glok – Dissident
  46. Guided by Voices – Zeppelin over China
  47. Guided by Voices – Warp and Woof
  48. Hand Habits – placeholder
  49. Hauschka – A Different Forest
  50. HEALTH – VOL. 4 :: SLAVES OF FEAR
  51. Helado Negro – This is How You Smile
  52. Holly Herndon – PROTO
  53. Hoshina Anniversary – Nihon No Ongaku / 日本の音楽」
  54. Insanlar – Demedim Mi
  55. Jacques Greene – Dawn Chorus
  56. Jade Bird – Jade Bird
  57. Jeffrey Lewis & The Voltage – Bad Wiring
  58. Jessica Pratt – Quiet Signs
  59. John Vanderslice – The Cedars
  60. Josh Garrels – Chrysaline
  61. Josh Ritter – Fever Breaks
  62. Joy Orbison – Slipping – EP
  63. Kacy & Clayton – Carrying On
  64. Kanye West – Jesus is King
  65. Karen O & Danger Mouse – Lux Prima
  66. Kelly Moran – Origin EP
  67. Kevin Morby – Oh My God
  68. Kim Gordon – No Home Record
  69. Lali Puna – Being Water EP
  70. Lana del Rey – Norman Fucking Rockwell
  71. Lightbath – Selected Public Works, Vol. 3
  72. Lily & Madeleine – Canterbury Girls
  73. Mira Calix – Utopia EP
  74. Mount Eerie – Lost Wisdom, Pt. 2 (feat. Julie Doiron)
  75. The Mountain Goats – In League with Dragons
  76. Mort Garson – Mother Earth’s Plantasia (Reissue)
  77. The National – I Am Easy to Find
  78. The New Pornographers – In the Morse Code of Brake Lights
  79. Nick Cave & the Bad Seesds – Ghosteen
  80. Nils Frahm – All Encores
  81. Nilüfer Yanya – Miss Universe
  82. Nivhek – After its own death /  Walking in a spiral towards the house
  83. North Mississippi Allstars – Up and Rolling
  84. Oso Oso – Basking in the Glow

  85. Over the Rhine – Love & Revelation
  86. Panda Bear – Buoys
  87. Pedro the Lion – Phoenix
  88. Peter Caws – The Book of Hylas (featuring Parkington Sisters)
  89. Purple Mountains – Purple Mountains
  90. Robert Ellis – Texas Piano Man
  91. (Sandy) Alex G – House of Sugar
  92. SASAMI – SASAMI
  93. Sharon Van Etten – Remind Me Tomorrow
  94. ShitKid – [Detention]
  95. Sigur Rós – 22° Lunar Halo
  96. Sigur Rós – Variations on Darkness
  97. Solange – When I Get Home
  98. Ssion – o
  99. Stella Donnelly – Beware the Dogs
  100. Steve Hauschildt – Nonlin
  101. Switchfoot – Native Tongue
  102. Tamaryn – Dreaming in the Dark
  103. Tegan and Sara – Hey, I’m Just Like You
  104. Temples – Hot Motion
  105. Tim Heidecker – Another Year in Hell EP
  106. Tim Hecker – Anoyo
  107. Timo Andres & Sufjan Stevens – The Decalogue
  108. Titus Andronicus – An Obelisk
  109. Toro y Moi – Outer Peace
  110. Townes Van Zandt – Sky Blue
  111. Tycho – Weather
  112. Vagabon – Vagabon
  113. Vampire Weekend – Father of the Bride
  114. Vangelis – Nocturne
  115. Various Artists – For the Throne (Music Inspired by Game of Thrones)
  116. Various Artists – Kankyō Ongaku: Japanese Ambient, Environmental & New Age Music 1980-1990
  117. Weezer – Weezer (Black Album)
  118. Weezer – Weezer (Teal Album)
  119. Weyes Blood – Titanic Rising
  120. Whitney – Forever Turned Around
  121. Why? – AOKOHIO
  122. Yeasayer – Erotic Reruns
  123. Ziúr – Atø

2019 – The Year in Review – Top Albums (Ambient)

A 2019 Year in Review list of albums that primarily skew towards the ambient, electronic, experimental and instrumental. I created a separate list for 2019 because I found myself increasingly turning to such records throughout the year. Part of the allure would definitely have to be the meditative, relaxing quality of many such recordings. Another might have been simply a kick I got on, after years of only occasionally listening to the odd Brian Eno ambient masterwork. Behold, the list:

15 Ernest Hood

15. Ernest Hood – Neighborhoods

A re-issue of an album originally released in 1974, assembled from a mesmerizing array of found sounds, field recordings and proto-ambient electronic music, Neighborhoods truly evokes a memory of times past. The auditory equivalent of being teleported back to a time without the internet, cellular phones and a myriad of digital devices with screens. Unencumbered by such modern niceties, the album streams past at a laconic pace, and, not unlike Midnight Cowboy, one of my favorite films first viewed in 2019 (and celebrating its 50th anniversary), it possesses the distinct quality of being a coherent slice of life, perfectly captured in the moment.

14 Sigur Rós

14. Sigur Rós – Variations on Darkness

Consisting of two, 20+ minute long tracks, Variations on Darkness is assembled from unreleased Sigur Rós material, as well as various multitracks of songs culled from the band’s back catalogue. The music was premiered at the Nordur og nidur festival, and utilized as a soundtrack to choreographed performances from the Iceland Dance Company. Cavernous and shot through with a palpable sense of foreboding, Variations on Darkness made for a terrific soundtrack to any daily news dump from 2019.

13 Górecki

13. Beth Gibbons, The Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra & Krzysztof Penderecki – Henryk Górecki: Symphony No. 3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs)

Beth Gibbons is the lead vocalist for Portishead. Krzysztof Penderecki is a Polish composer whose work has been featured in films, most notably The Exorcist and The Shining. Here, they take on Polish composer Henryk Górecki’s famous Symphony No. 3. A sprawling, mournful piece of composition, the Symphony of Sorrowful Songs plays like the score to the denouement of a Sam Mendes picture.

12 Kankyō Ongaku

12. Various Artists – Kankyō Ongaku: Japanese Ambient, Environmental & New Age Music 1980-1990

Perhaps it is indeed emblematic of what Pitchfork deemed, “the growth of functional listening,” that I happened to compile this particular album list for the first time this year. The ubiquity of supermassive streaming libraries now virtually at our fingertips and always available for our thirsty eardrums means we can find ways to soundtrack our lives at any and every moment we wish. Kankyō Ongaku is such a soundtrack*, culled from a number of Japanese ambient electronic artists from the 1980s. This compilation is curated by Spencer Doran, of Visible Cloaks, and released on Light in the Attic Records (the very same responsible for the Lewis reissues and subsequent solution to the decades-old mystery of their provenance). Highly recommended. *The vinyl release of this album is a 3 x LP and features 25 tracks, while the streaming version is limited to only 10.

11 Steve Hauschildt

11. Steve Hauschildt – Nonlin

Steve Hauschildt, formerly of Emeralds, released Nonlin, his latest LP on Ghostly International, in late 2019. I hitherto had only a dim awareness of his work. Much like another of my favorite albums from 2019 (Floating Points’ “Crush”), Nonlin offers up a hybrid cross-section of thoughtfully-composed electronic music, leaning rather heavily on the synthesizers. An art-house Stranger Things soundtrack, if you will.

10 Nils Frahm

10. Nils Frahm – All Encores

All Encores is a collection of the contents of 3 Encores EPs released over the course of 2019 on the heels of Frahm’s excellent 2018 LP, All Melody. Representing a selection of works that are far more spare and unassuming than the baroque, multifaceted splendor of All Melody, the collection of EPs would be a fitting accompaniment to any sort of weather, be it fair or frightful.

9 Lightbath

9. Lightbath – Selected Public Works, Vol. 3

A brand new discovery for me in 2019, Lightbath is the brainchild of composer/improviser Bryan Noll. Selected Public Works, Vol. 3 collects various of his modular synthesizer performances from the past 4 years. Volumes 1 and 2 have been released only on cassette tape thus far, while Vol. 3 is available to stream online. Another EP, Vol. 4, was also released in late 2019. His work is reminiscent of Brian Eno, SURVIVE, CFCF and Oneohtrix Point Never. The soundtrack to a celestial zen garden.

8 Glok

8. Glok – Dissident

Another brand new discovery for me in 2019. Glok is the electronic alias of Andy Bell, guitarist and vocalist of the English shoegaze band Ride. A sprawling record, Dissident fuses, “synth wave and Detroit techno via a love of John Carpenter soundtracks with dissonant atmospherics and an acid throb,” and rewards many repeat spins.

7 Floating Points

7. Floating Points – Crush

Floatings Points is Sam Shepard, a DJ, musician and producer from the UK. Crush is a record I have been looking forward to ever since his debut, Elaenia, was released back in 2015. A deep and exacting record, Crush is something of a Rube Goldberg machine in album form. A musical sub-genre called ‘Braindance’ supposedly applies here. The album offers up tasty morsels in a precisely-constructed presentation format, and you can pluck any one out to enjoy. A virtual buffet that has been thoughtfully arranged and pared back to showcase a number of unique tastes.

6 Hauschka

6. Hauschka – A Different Forest

Volker Bertelmann is the name of the experimental “prepared” pianist who goes by Hauschka. Once upon a time, he was a member of a German hip-hop group. Nowadays, he has undergone an extended metamorphosis to become, more or less, a bonafide neoclassical pianist. A Different Forest is very much a straightforward affair, and requires nothing more than a simple appreciation of the unprepared ivories to enjoy. His playing on this album is expressive and warm.

5 Kelly Moran

5. Kelly Moran – Origin EP

Kelly Moran’s follow-up to her excellent Ultraviolet, released in 2018. Like Hauschka, she is a specialist of the “prepared piano,” which is a piano that has had its sound altered by the placement of various objects on or between the strings. Origin is a no slouch for an EP, clocking in at over 36 minutes in length. Here we find some brand new material, along with improvisational, proto-versions of pieces from Ultraviolet. The tapestry of mesmerizing sounds she conjures from the piano is at once both ostentatious and austere.

4 Tim Hecker

4. Tim Hecker – Anoyo

Tim Hecker followed up 2018’s Konoyo (this world) with companion piece Anoyo (the world over there). The tracks on the latter come from the same sessions that produced the tracks on the former.  Drawing upon Japanese court music style gagaku, Hecker recorded Anoyo with the ensemble Tokyo Gakuso. A voyage into the vacuum of space. Boundless and immense.

3 Fennesz

3. Fennesz – Agora

The first LP from Austrian composer Christian Fennesz in 5 years, Agora is an album of layers. Despite being recorded largely indoors with guitars, the four tracks comprising its 48 minute runtime manage to evoke an eerie spaciousness. Unlike AnoyoAgora feels like a voyage among the stars that turns out to have actually been a descent into the Mariana Trench.

2 Mort Garson

2. Mort Garson – Plantasia

Another reissue, this one from Mort Garson, a pioneer of discrete music and electronic composition. Originally released in 1976, Plantasia is a wonderful cornucopia of Moog synthesizer music, surprisingly organic and warm, and absolutely on-point as far as its central conceit is concerned (music for plants and the people who love them). 40-plus years later, thanks to projects such as the MIDI Sprout, music for and by plants feels more timely than ever.

1 Nivhek

1. Nivhek – After its own death / Walking in a spiral towards the house

Nivhek is a new moniker for Liz Harris, otherwise known as Grouper. This record is comprised of two long-form performances, each broken into two pieces, and originally performed as a part of two different artistic residencies: one in Murmansk, Russia, the other in the Azores, in Portugal. Taken together as a full release, now, in 2019, and clocking in at just about one hour, the cumulative result packs a mighty wallop. From glossolalia to drone to faraway bells and chimes, found sounds and malfunctioning equipment, distant footsteps and funereal abysms of sound, the album plays like a long stroll deep into the desolation of winter’s grasp. As with many of the albums I’ve selected for this new Year in Review list, it rewards patience and many repeat spins.

Apple Music Playlists:

Top of 2019 – Albums (Ambient)

Top of 2019 – Top Songs (Ambient)

 

2014 ~ The Year in Music

2014 ~ The Year in Music

Podcasts ruled my car’s stereo for the majority of 2014 (Serial, anyone?)

Even so, I did listen to plenty of tremendous musical creations through those well-worn speakers. Nothing received as many replays as Withered Hand, the solo project of 30-somthing Scottish wannabe-loser Dan Wilson. His songwriting is incisive, catchy, self-deprecating and filled with candor and wit. His voice sounds like the lilt of Billy Boyd’s Pippin singing to Denethor, steward of Gondor. He plays guitar. He waxes poetic about California and In-N-Out Burger. He is the world’s most interesting singer/songwriter.

Withered Hand - New Gods

Top Albums of 2014

  1. Withered Hand – New Gods
  2. The War on Drugs – Lost in the Dream
  3. Damien Jurado – Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son
  4. Grouper – Ruins
  5. Woods – With Light and With Love
  6. Caribou – Our Love
  7. Spoon – They Want My Soul
  8. Death Vessel – Island Intervals
  9. Luxury – Trophies
  10. The Notwist – Close to the Glass

Top Songs of 2014

  1. Fall Apart by Withered Hand
  2. Moving to the Left by Woods
  3. Kong by The Notwist
  4. We Agreed by Death Vessel
  5. Sinking Stone by GEMS
  6. Clearing by Grouper
  7. Silver Timothy by Damien Jurado
  8. Love Over Desire by Withered Hand
  9. Closer by FKA Twigs
  10. In Reverse by The War on Drugs
  11. Inside Out by Spoon
  12. Velvet Antlers by Death Vessel
  13. Red Eyes by The War on Drugs
  14. Back Home by Caribou
  15. Eyes to the Wind by The War on Drugs
  16. Horseshoe by Withered Hand
  17. Black Tambourine by Withered Hand
  18. Medusa by GEMS
  19. California by Withered Hand
  20. Chandelier by Sia

2014 ~ The Year in Review Begins

2014 ~ The Year in ReviewAs this list coalesces from the sum of my temporal experiences in 2014, I realize that the amount of preparation involved is actually more than ever before… rendering the process a little less involved than past years. And so it feels half-hearted. But it’s not.

I live within striking distance of the second largest metropolitan area by population in the United States, and I have missed a number of things.

I missed seeing The Notwist in San Francisco in June – when I was actually in the city. My phone died, I had no means of transportation and it was dark. I should have gone anyway.

I missed seeing Whiplash, The Tale of Princess Kaguya, Birdman, The Book of Life, Calvary, Force Majeure, Wild, The Imitation Game, Godzilla, Selma, and Inherent Vice, despite the fact that they all played nearby.

I missed going to Peasant in New York City and trying Frank’s Steak, based upon a recipe born in the middle ages after a battle where there were hundreds of dead horses on the ground. Never let a good horse go to waste…

I missed visiting the Guggenheim and the Met, my car broke down en route to a Padres home game that I subsequently missed, I also missed going on Drinkabout in North Park, swimming with the seals in La Jolla Cove, and going to a vertical tasting of every vintage of 3 Floyds Dark Lord.

Those are things I missed. Sometimes, dwelling on missed opportunities can obscure all of the caught opportunities and adventures the year had in store. This is my review of 2014, and I shall break it into some bite-sized, pop-culture-centric pieces for rapid consumption.

2014 ~ month by month

January – our good friend Cat and her daughter Kyla visit us in San Diego, CA for some fun in the sun, on the beach, eating sushi and unwinding. While driving around La Jolla, we get hungry and stop at the nearest Mexican place we could find – and thus, discover Oscar’s Mexican Seafood. THE BEST FISH TACOS EVER.

February – The Stone Brewing Co. “Calm Before the Storm” event allows me the chance to try nearly every single, retired Vertical Epic brew in their archive. Bree and I go to Urge Gastropub for a special Valentine’s Day dinner date and had some house-made truffles that were literally amazeballs. Tania and Bree make home made sushi after we did some shopping at an Asian supermarket down in San Diego.

March – I join the Bruery’s Preservation Society in order to get my hands on some fancy beers and expand my brew-consciousness. Anthony comes back to visit and ponder whether or not to move again to the great state of California and I take him to Churchill’s Renaissance to drink expensive beer. Tania, Bree, myself and John decide to hike to the top of Mount Woodson, home of the famous “Tater Chip Rock.” My second cousin Kaarin also comes to visit and we take her to Oscar’s for the BEST FISH TACOS EVER… and she agreed.

April – I travel to Richmond, VA for business.

May –

June – I travel to San Jose, CA for business. We move into a house – huge upgrade from being in an apartment. Bree is thrilled to spend our anniversary in a new location for once.

July – We attend my cousin Caleb’s wedding in Sylvania, OH, also we attend the San Diego Comic Con, also I return to Ohio (Columbus, this time) to be a groomsman in Sam Shepard’s wedding. I visit a lot of people in July. It is glorious and very expensive. Benji and Megumi put me up in their charming new home near the German Village in Columbus.

August –

September – I travel to New York City for business, arriving in the Big Apple on my birthday.

October –

November – I travel to Toronto, ON for business and then take a flight from the great, white north down to Tampa, FL for another cousin’s wedding. Bree comes from San Diego, separately.

December – For the holidays, Bree and I travel to East Texas to visit her family. We arrive on Christmas Eve and return to San Diego, which had just received a rare dusting of SNOW(!), on New Year’s Eve. Bree’s family all got sick while we visited, and so I finally succumb to it on the day we return. We ring in the new year huddled under blankets, drinking soup and ginger tea.

2014 ~ The Year In:

Photos

Food

Beer

Films

Music

2013 – The Year’s Best Music – Albums

An album is a vastly different critter than a song. Songs can scamper about and amuse. They can invade your space and distract you for a few minutes’ reverie. Albums, on the other hand, are an invitation to an in-depth conversation, or perhaps a commitment to traverse a certain distance. Good albums work hard to capture your attention in new ways with each listen. Albums have layers. Songs can have layers, too, but they’re over in a few minutes (rather, most of them are, I should say, setting aside Joanna Newsom and Sufjan Stevens, etc.)

I picked ten 2013 calendar releases. I wrote one line about each album. There were plenty more on my list, but time is finite. Here they are:

The Happiness Waltz

10. The Happiness Waltz by Josh Rouse

Josh Rouse first warmed his way into my young heart with his self-assured bilingual album Subtítulo.

Herein Wild

9. Herein Wild by Frankie Rose

Haunting and self-assured.

Shaking the Habitual

8. Shaking the Habitual by The Knife

An album of perpetual left-hand turns and precipice-hugging navigation.

Love's Crushing Diamond

7. Love’s Crushing Diamond by Mutual Benefit

Tranquil and meditative, deeply reassuring and filled with questions.

At Home

6. At Home by Keep Shelly In Athens

An album of epic proportions that manages to feel intimate and DIY.

Limits of Desire

5. Limits of Desire by Small Black

Small Black are the new Nada Surf.

The Bones of What You Believe

4. The Bones of What You Believe by CHVRCHES

This album shows up on every other 2013 ‘Best of’ list I have read to date.

Trouble Will Find Me

3. Trouble Will Find Me by The National

Love the fact that it is a National album, through-and-through… entirely un-disappointed.

After Dark 2

2. After Dark 2 by Various Artists

I was slain on the doorstep of Johnny Jewel and his cadre of musicians for many months.

Metrics of Affection

1. Metrics of Affection by Bombadil

No two ways about it- Bombadil took the escalator up and friggin’ ARRIVED.

And there you have it. 2014 is already looking killer with forthcoming releases from The Notwist, Damien Jurado, and Death Vessel. I, for one, am stoked on 2014. I need a turntable. And good speakers.