“Wanderin’ Star” as performed by Lee Marvin in Paint Your Wagon

Without a doubt, Paint Your Wagon (1969) has got to be the most bizarre movie musical I have ever watched. Adapted for the big screen by Paddy Chayefsky from Alan Jay Lerner’s original 1951 stage production, the film stars Lee Marvin, Clint Eastwood (his one and only appearance in a musical) and Jean Seberg. Although I have never seen a performance of the musical on stage, I read up on it after viewing the film. There are… rather quite a number of differences between the two.

Far and away my favorite performance in the film is Marvin’s wordly, gristly Forty-Niner character, name of Ben Rumson. He also performs my favorite musical number, Wanderin’ Star. Marvin famously insisted on performing all of the singing parts himself, even though he had no real training as a vocalist. His rendition of this song actually became a chart-topping hit in the UK, beating out The Beatles’ Let it Be.

My second favorite musical performance in the film has got to be Harve Presnell’s rendition of, They Call the Wind Mariah. Fun fact, Harve Presnell also famously played the part of Wade Gustafson, father of Jean Lundegaard, in the Coen Brothers’ inimitable classic Fargo.

maria gustafson

Anyhow, if you have 3 hours to kill, and you like show tunes about mining for gold, and if you’re any kind of Paddy Chayefsky fan, Paint Your Wagon is well worth watching.

Addendum: Hell on Earth

the-devils-american-poster-1

After viewing The Devils (1971) the other day, I searched and found Mark Kermode’s 2004 documentary about the film, containing some of the storied “deleted” scenes that were removed by British censors, including the scene dubbed, “the rape of Christ.”

Hell on Earth is a production of BBC Four and contains a healthy amount of graphic imagery. Definitely NSFW but also essential if you, like me, are a fan of Ken Russell’s film.

the-devils-1200-1200-675-675-crop-000000

2018 – The Year in Review – Film & Television

[This was an unpublished draft I’m dusting off… and almost in time for the compilation of my 2019 Year in Review 🤦🏽‍♂️]

Increasingly, the lines between entertainment mediums are being blurred and new forms are emerging. From the entire-season-all-at-one-time binge-fests facilitated by the likes of Netflix, Amazon and Hulu, to the evolution of the “mini-series” or “limited” series on HBO, FX and Showtime, etc. The ubiquitous nature of visual entertainment these days means a glut of content, comprised of new material jostling for eyeballs amidst a pantheon of classics.

2018 found me visiting a number of classics for the very first time in my life, while also trying to keep up with the water cooler conversations about whichever comic book character had a CGI monster battle last week.

They have a saying at Pixar, “Story Is King.” Which means, in essence, that it’s far more important for an audience member to walk away from a film feeling something rather than to simply show a barrage of eye-popping visuals or reveal some kind of logic-bending twist surprise at the end. If the effect is powerful enough it is even possible for a good story to completely alter an audience member’s worldview.

Every film on this list told a story with characters that made me feel something real.

So, without further ado, here are Joel’s Best Films viewed (for the first time) in 2018:

10 Key Largo

10. Key Largo (1948)

Owing largely to my subscription to FilmStuck (R.I.P.), I was able to watch a whole slew of classic Hollywood films this year. Dominating my watchlist in 2018 were the films of John Huston and Humphrey Bogart, 3 of which are on this list.  First up is the Noir Thriller Key Largo, a taut, gripping screen adaption of the stage play by the same name originally written in blank verse by Maxwell Anderson. Bogart gives an understated performance as a WWII veteran who is undergoing a personal crisis of confidence. Supporting him in the cast are Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall (Bogart’s real-life wife), and Lionel Barrymore, et al. The heart of the story revolves around concepts of heroism and machismo, the nature of valor and honor and what real courage looks like. When tested, what man can truly claim to have given his all?

09 The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

9. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

Huston and Bogart teamed up again in 1948 to make The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, adapted from the novel of the same name, written by B. Traven, an author whose true identity remains unknown to this very day. This time around, Bogart shares the screen with the director’s real-life father, Walter Huston, who steals every scene in his role as Howard, the grizzled, old prospector who is hired by Bogart’s character, Dobbs, and his partner, Curtain, played by Tim Holt.  The film is a masterful case study in avarice, greed, and the soul-corrupting effects of selfish ambition.

08 The Maltese Falcon

8. The Maltese Falcon (1941)

A re-adaptation of an already-well-known story, The Maltese Falcon was also a collaboration between Humphrey Bogart and John Huston. Once again, the big themes are avarice and deceit. I definitely was on a noir kick in 2018.

07 Lawrence of Arabia

7. Lawrence of Arabia

An epic oft-cited as the greatest film of all time, Lawrence of Arabia exists on a plane of filmmaking all its own. There are no matte shots. No glass plates. Every performance is a revelation. Even though it can be a bit weird to see Anthony Quinn and Alec Guinness pretending to be Arabs. Peter O’Toole puts out a match. An inimitable film.

06 Thor Ragnarok

6. Thor: Ragnarok

I watched this movie FOUR TIMES. Not much else to say about it except that Taika Waititi is a joyously-talented film maker who manages to execute at a very high level in his craft while maintaining a wry sense of self-deprecating humor. A perfect director to rehabilitate the foundering Thor franchise.

05 The Trip to Spain

5. The Trip to Spain

Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon returned in the latest installment in, “the only movie franchise that matters” back in 2017. The ending took me off guard. They could keep making these films forever, and I’ll show up for each and every one.

04 Loving

4. Loving

Based upon the true-life story of Richard and Mildred Loving, the couple whose arrest for interracial marriage, then illegal in the state of Virginia, led to a legal battle that culminated in the Supreme Court’s historic 1967 decision. A powerful and effective portrayal by Jeff Nichols and his excellent cast.

03 A Ghost Story

3. A Ghost Story

A metaphysical journey into the big questions of life, death and the hereafter from the same guy who directed the live-action remake of Pete’s Dragon? OK. David Lowery’s film is mostly dialogue-free, and exists in a realm of pure cinema. Featuring my second-favorite Bonnie “Prince” Billy acting performance (after Old Joy).

02 The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

2. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

The Coen Bros., like many modern, “auteurs” have a distinct palette with which they weave the tapestries of their art form. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, in many ways, is a kind of buffet line of their favorite tropes, archetypes, musical stylings and the ever-ready ensemble of talent they’ve accrued in their peerless careers. Each vignette in this anthology-as-film has a distinct story to tell, and most of them are tragic.

01 The Best Years of Our Lives

1. The Best Years of our Lives (1946)

William Wyler returned from service in WWII to make the best film of his entire career:  A weaving together of the stories of three war veterans returning home after the conclusion of the war to find that they no longer understand and fit in with the society they fought to preserve and protect.

I am not a veteran, and thus lack the basic concepts of what the experience of serving in the United States Armed Forces is like, much less what the psychological, physical and spiritual toll of going to war feels like. However, after I finished The Best Years of our Lives, I felt I had come as close as possible to having the ability to fully empathize with those who’ve served, and to begin to have an inkling of the sacrifices they are asked to make for their fellow countrymen.

The Best Years of our Lives is a supremely humbling film. It features incredible performances from each of its leads, two of whom were real-life veterans. Frederic March served in WWI. Harold Russell served in WWII. The kind of film I will never forget. Steven Spielberg has said that he makes a point of watching it at least once a year.

And that’s my list! From 2018…

Honorable mentions: Dunkirk, The Cincinnati Kid (1965), The Endless, Incredibles 2, Look Back in Anger (1959), War for the Planet of the Apes, The Post, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri, The Florida Project, Six Shooter, Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), Kimi no na wa. (Your Name.), Little Dieter Needs to Fly, Whiskey Galore! (1949), Room, Revolutionary Road, Stay Hungry (1976), The Ladykillers (1955), Planet of the Apes (1968), and First Reformed. Someday I’ll write more about First Reformed.

Complete viewing list from 2018:

Regular = movie watched on a TV or other small screen device
BOLD = denotes theatrical viewing
Italic = denotes a “television series” or “mini series”
Underlined = denotes a short film (30 minutes or less)

  1. 20th Century Women
  2. Across the Pacific (1942)
  3. The Adjustment Bureau
  4. Adventure Time: Seasons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10
  5. Altered Carbon: Season 1
  6. Alien
  7. Alien3
  8. Alien Versus Predator
  9. Aliens
  10. Alien: Covenant
  11. Alien: Resurrection
  12. An American Tail
  13. The Animation Show of Shows
    • Can You Do It by Quentin Baillieux
    • Tiny Big by Lia Bertels
    • Next Door by Pete Doctor
    • The Alan Dimension by Jac Clinch
    • Beautiful Like Elsewhere by Elise Simard
    • Hangman by Paul Julian & Les Goldman
    • The Battle of San Romano by Georges Schwizgebel
    • Gokurosama by Aurore Gal, Clementine Frère, Yukiko Meignein, Anna Mertz, Robin Migliorelli, & Roman Salvini
    • Dear Basketball by Glen Keane
    • Island by Robert Löbel & Max Mörtl
    • Unsatisfying by Parallel Studio
    • The Burden by Niki Lindroth von Bahr
    • Les Abeilles Domestiques by Alexanne Desrosiers
    • Our Wonderful Nature – The Common Chameleon by Tomer Eshed
    • Casino by Steven Wolosehn
    • Everything by David O’Reilly
  14. Asparagus (1979)
  15. Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Seasons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 & 11
  16. Avengers: Infinity War
  17. The Aviator
  18. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  19. Barry Lyndon (1975)
  20. Ben-Hur (1959)
  21. The Best Years of our Lives (1946)
  22. The Big Sleep (1946)
  23. The Big Sleep (1978)
  24. Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey
  25. Black Mirror: Seasons 1, 2, 3, & 4
    • Season 1
      • The Entire History of You
    • Season 2
      • Be Right Back
      • The Waldo Moment
      • White Bear
      • White Christmas
    • Season 3
      • Hated in the Nation
    • Season 4
      • Arkangel
      • Crocodile
      • Hang the DJ
      • USS Callister
  26. Black Panther
  27. The Burning Hell (1974)
  28. Cars 3
  29. Children of the Whales: Season 1
  30. National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation
  31. The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
  32. Coma (1978)
  33. Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee: Seasons 1, 2, 3, and 4
  34. Crazy Heart
  35. Darkest Hour
  36. Dave Chapelle: The Bird Revelation
  37. Dave Chapelle: Equanimity
  38. Dead Ringers (1988)
  39. Dear Basketball
  40. The Disaster Artist
  41. Disenchantment: Season 1
  42. Dude, Where’s My Car?
  43. Dunkirk
  44. Early Man
  45. The Endless
  46. Evan Almighty
  47. Evil Genius
  48. The Exorcist
  49. The Expanse: Season 1
  50. Fantastic Mr. Fox
  51. Farewell, My Lovely (1975)
  52. Felix Comes Back (1922)
  53. First Reformed
  54. Five Easy Pieces (1970)
  55. The Florida Project
  56. Game of Thrones: Seasons 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
  57. A Ghost Story (x2)
  58. The Good Place: Seasons 1 and 2
  59. The Greatest Showman
  60. Grey Gardens (1976)
  61. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (x2)
  62. Gulliver’s Travels (1996)
  63. The Hand that Rocks the Cradle
  64. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
  65. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1
  66. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2
  67. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  68. Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince
  69. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
  70. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  71. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  72. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
  73. The Hobbit: Bilbo 3.1 Final Edit
  74. The Hudsucker Proxy
  75. I Am Not Your Negro
  76. Incredibles 2
  77. Incredibles 2
  78. Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
  79. Innerspace (1987)
  80. It: Chapter One
  81. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
  82. Key Largo (1948)
  83. Majo no takkyûbin (Kiki’s Delivery Service)
  84. Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)
  85. The King of Marvin Gardens (1972)
  86. Knights of Sidonia: Season 2
  87. Kong: Skull Island
  88. Lady Bird
  89. Ladyhawke (1985)
  90. The Ladykillers (1955)
  91. Lawrence of Arabia
  92. Lightning Sketches (1907)
  93. Little Dieter Needs to Fly
  94. Little Dorrit (2008)
  95. The Little Hours
  96. Look Back in Anger (1959)
  97. Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro
  98. Funny or Die Presents: Lost Masterpieces of Pornography
  99. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (Extended Edition)
  100. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition)
  101. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition)
  102. Loving
  103. The Maltese Falcon (1941)
  104. Man on the Moon
  105. The Man Who Invented Christmas
  106. The Man Who Would Be King (1975)
  107. McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)
  108. Meari to majo no hana (Mary and the Witch’s Flower)
  109. Meet the Happiest Guy in the World
  110. The Mist
  111. The Mirror Crack’d (1980)
  112. Moon
  113. Moonlight
  114. MST3K: I Accuse My Parents
  115. MST3K: Time Chasers
  116. Murder Ahoy (1964)
  117. Murder at the Gallop (1963)
  118. Murder Most Foul (1964)
  119. Murder on the Orient Express (2017)
  120. Murder, She Said (1961)
  121. My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes
  122. Neko no ongaeshi (The Cat Returns)
  123. Network (1976)
  124. My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman: Barack Obama
  125. My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman: George Clooney
  126. The Ωmega Man (1971) 
  127. The Omen (1976)
  128. One Punch Man: Wanpanman (One-Punch Man): Season 1
  129. Oscar
  130. Pacific Rim
  131. The Philadelphia Story (1940)
  132. Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams: Season 1
    • “Autofac” based on “Autofac”
    • “The Commuter” based on “The Commuter”
    • “Crazy Diamond” based on “Sales Pitch”
    • “The Father Thing” based on “The Father Thing”
    • “The Hood Maker” based on “The Hood Maker”
    • “Human Is” based on “Human Is”
    • “Impossible Planet” based on “The Impossible Planet”
    • “KAO” based on “Hanging Stranger”
    • “Real Life” based on “Exhibit Piece”
    • “Safe and Sound” based on “Foster, You’re Dead”
  133. The Pink Panther Strikes Again
  134. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales
  135. Planet of the Apes (1968)
  136. The Post
  137. Ready Player One
  138. Ready Player One
  139. ReBoot: Season 1
  140. Regular Show: Seasons 3 and 4
  141. Revolutionary Road
  142. Requiem for a Dream
  143. Ricky Jay and his 52 Assistants
  144. The Road to El Dorado
  145. Robin Hood: Men in Tights
  146. Room
  147. The Running Man
  148. Det sjunde inseglet (The Seventh Seal) (1957)
  149. The Shining (1980)
  150. Shocker (1989)
  151. Six Shooter
  152. Sonic the Hedgehog: Season 1
  153. Speed Racer
  154. SpongeBob SquarePants: Seasons 1 and  2
  155. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Seasons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
  156. Star Trek: The Next Generation: Season 7
  157. Star Vs. the Forces of Evil: Seasons 1, 2 & 3
  158. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  159. Stay Hungry (1976)
  160. Tales from the Script
  161. Thor: Ragnarok (4 times, yes… FOUR TIMES)
  162. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
  163. Time of Day
  164. Tom Jones
  165. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)
  166. The Trip to Spain
  167. Trollhunters: Part 2
  168. The Twilight Zone: Seasons 1, 2, 3 and 5
  169. Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets
  170. War for the Planet of the Apes
  171. WarCraft
  172. Watership Down (1978)
  173. We’re Back: A Dinosaur’s Story
  174. Westworld: Season 2
  175. What We Do in the Shadows (x2)
  176. Whiskey Galore! (1949)
  177. Wind in the Willows (1987) (x2)
  178. Wonder Showzen: Season 2
  179. Kimi no na wa. (Your Name.)

 

The Devils (1971)

the-devils-film-2

I just finished watching Ken Russel’s film The Devils (1971), currently streaming over at The Criterion Channel.

The film is itself an adaptation of a 1960 play of the same name by John Whiting, as well as the 1952 non-fictoin novel by Aldux Huxley, entitled, The Devils of Loudun.

Criterion is streaming the 108 minute cut of the film, which is not the uncut version.

The events depicted in the film are based on true events which occurred in Loudun, France in the year 1634. Interestingly enough, Cardinal Richelieu (of Three Musketeers infamy) figures in the story as a kind of distant antagonist.

Without giving too much away, the story centers on a French Catholic Priest, Urbain Grandier (Oliver Reed), and the Mother Superior of Loudun’s Ursuline convent, Sister Jeanne of the Angels (Vanessa Redgrave). The titular “Devils” go unnamed for most of the film, although an Exorcist eventually puts his finger on them. They are Lucifer, Beelzebub, Satan, Astaroth, Leviathan, and Elimi.

The document their pact is scrawled upon doesn’t make an appearance in the film. Indeed, the presense of a diabolical, supernatural force of evil is all but absent from the proceedings. At the end, the viewer is left to wonder just *who* the devils really are.

After viewing the film, I did some searching and came upon famed movie critic Roger Ebert’s review of an 111 minute U.S. theatrical cut he viewed in Chicago around the New Year in 1971. He seems to have been either offended or fatigued (or both) by the depiction of the events of the film and his entire review kind of just sounds as though he really hated even having to write about the film. Nevertheless, as with all of his writing, it stands apart.

Now truth, as I’ve explained before, is what’s real. If it isn’t real, it isn’t true, which is why a stone is better than a dream. If it isn’t reality, who needs it? Or could lay hands on it, anyway? And everything on the list above really happened, yes it did. All the events and persons depicted in The Devils are intended to be confused with actual events and persons. How do I know? Ken Russell tells me so.

He gave the film zero stars. AKA, a thumbs down. If memory serves, Ebert was Catholic. That may have factored into his rating.

Speaking about the controversy over the film’s graphic depictions of, well, everything, Oliver Reed is reported to have quipped, “We never set out to make a pretty Christian film, Charlton Heston made enough of those… The film is about twisted people.”

vague-visages-of-love-and-other-demons-the-devils-one

Elsewhere, in an interview conducted last year for the now-defunct FilmStruck (which has been more or less reborn as The Criterion Channel), Kevin M. Flanagan discussed the film and remarked that some critics thought of Huxley’s novel as having been influenced by the HUAC hearings in the US at the time he was writing the book.

My own impression is that the film is an arresting visual achievement that manages to encapsulate the profound and boundless heights and depths to which human beings are capable of going in the name of religion. Some basic themes I found were individuality and freedom versus tyranny and collectivism, faith and conviction versus invective and hysteria, and purity versus impurity.

All graphic depictions and artistic liberties aside, against the backdrop of the French Renaissance and Richelieu’s systematic persecution of the Protestants, I found the story to be hopeful. That a man can choose to give himself over to various powers in recognition of their authority, or he may choose not to do so. Furthermore: that a man’s ability to recognize the primacy of an authority is directly informed by the nature of his relationship with it, and contingent upon his acknowledgement of its reality, or alternatively, his repudiation of its paucity and fraudulence.

Perhaps, though, it is easier to go around looking for devils behind every misfortune than it is to step into the potential of one’s own free will.

2018 – The Year in Review – Music – Top Songs

Love in the Time of Lexapro

I’ve put together an Apple Music playlist, distilling over 140 songs I culled from 2018 (and a couple that are technically from 2017, if you wanna split hairs) and assembled a *short* 3 hour long playlist. Slap on a pair of headphones or fire up the HomePod or off-brand Bluetooth speaker and have a listen!

Top of 2018 – Apple Music – Joel’s Top Songs

  1. Babylon – Oneohtrix Point Never
  2. Duration Meditation – Reto A Ichi
  3. Mongolia (The Ancient Era) [Pastor Song; Khoomii Improvisation] – Nature Ganganbaigal of Tengger Cavalry
  4. Time – Angelo De Augustine
  5. Eyes Wide Awake – Calexico
  6. Moon Bog – Oh Sees
  7. Camera (On Film) – Chromatics
  8. Angie – Shame
  9. Wildflowers – Soccer Mommy
  10. Shades of Blue – Yo La Tengo
  11. The Last Great Washington State – Damien Jurado
  12. Driving – Grouper
  13. Helix (Edit) – Kelly Moran
  14. I Shall Love 2 – Julia Holter
  15. Poor Sucker – Low
  16. In My View – Young Fathers
  17. Empty Vessels – DeVotchKa
  18. When You’re Small – MGMT
  19. Woo – Beach House
  20. Chasing Stars – Postiljonen
  21. When I’m with Him – Empress Of
  22. The Whole Universe Wants to Be Touched – Nils Frahm
  23. Come Wayward Souls – The Blasting Company
  24. Potatus Et Molassus – The Blasting Company
  25. Time Adventure (feat. Niki Yang, Sean Giambrone, Steve Little, Hynden Walch, Olivia Olson, John DiMaggio, Pendleton Ward, Justin Roiland, Maria Bamford, Jessica DiCiccu & Tom Kenny) – Adventure Time, Rebecca Sugar & Tim Kiefer
  26. When a Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings – Willie Watson & Tim Blake Nelson
  27. At Least the Sky Is Blue (feat. Ariel Pink) – Ssion
  28. Hang On Me (Piano Version) – St. Vincent
  29. Suspirium – Thom Yorke
  30. Dancing and Fire – Low
  31. Percy Faith – Damien Jurado
  32. Slow Burn – Kacey Musgraves
  33. Venice Bitch – Lana Del Rey
  34. Two Slow Dancers – Mitski
  35. Always Up – Low
  36. last piece – Lykke Li
  37. Heaven in Farsi – PAINT
  38. Tenderness – Parquet Courts
  39. The and Song – Jeffrey Lewis
  40. Fear The Future (Piano Version) – St. Vincent
  41. Last Wave – They Might Be Giants
  42. Disarray – Low
  43. Babylon – Oneohtrix Point Never & (Sandy) Alex G

 

2018 – The Year in Review – Music – Top Albums

Wait, is 2018 over already? I managed to squeeze in a whole bunch of music listening this year, soundtracking every waking minute of my life with some fresh tunes streaming off the world wide webbings, passing through some algorithms harvesting my every play, skip and replay, traversing the atmosphere, finally emitting from whatever untethered speaker setup is handy at the moment. What a world.

Without further ado, here are my top ten albums of 2018:

10 kacey musgraves

10. Kacey Musgraves – Golden Hour

Darlin’, you take the high horse, and I’ll take the high road
If you’re too good for us, you’ll be good ridin’ solo

~ “High Horse”

Instantly wonderful. Front-loaded with catchy melodies and concepts ranging from the mundane to the holy, every touch is illuminated by Musgraves’ beautiful singing voice and distinct East-Texas twang. Hailing from Mineola, Texas, she represents a bright future both musically and with regard to the shifting, growing worldview of this generation, who must inherit the legacy of their damaged forebears.

9 anenon

9. Anenon – Tongue

Musician and composer Brian Allen Simon has delivered, “A jazz album, an electronic album, an ambient album, a classical album, an agnostic spiritual” in Tongue.

8 oneohtrix point never

8. Oneohtrix Point Never – Age Of

And a tower casts a shadow
Fairest when you speak
I love it when I see you
In a state of disbelief

~ “Babylon”

Daniel Lopatin returns to his Oneohtrix Point Never alias to release one of the year’s most inscrutable albums. The auditory equivalent of stirring together every medium of analog and digital recording from the past 35 years, along with a light sauté of auto-tuned vocals. Age Of rewards many repeat listens.

7 tmbg

7. They Might Be Giants – I Like Fun

We die alone, we die afraid
We live in error, we’re naked and alone
We die (Afraid)

~ “Last Wave”

Taking the highlights of their Dial-A-Song club and compiling them into a proper studio album, TMBG released a tightly-wound, anthemic album that functions just as well as a distracting and cerebral pop medley as it does as a polemic about America’s current political landscape. Death, despair and various forms of outrage fueled the Johns and propel the resulting material into the rarified air of a foot-tapping, hilarious album that is staring into the abyss the entire time.

6 mountain man

6. Mountain Man – Magic Ship

Amelia Meath, Molly Sarle and Alexandra Sauser-Monnig comprise the vocal trio Mountain Man. If the sirens from O Brother, Where Art Thou? went into a remote studio to record an album with only their beguiling voices and a dusty songbook from an Appalachian cabin, I imagine that the result might resemble Magic Ship.

5 mitski

5. Mitski – Be the Cowboy

But as it is, and it is
We’re just two slow dancers
Last ones out

~ “Two Slow Dancers”

Mitski Miyawaki’s tour-de-force followup to 2016’s excellent Puberty 2 ups the ante in every possible way. Wall-to-wall hooks, incisive songwriting chops and a preternatural prowess for expressing complex and nuanced thoughts within a head-banger make this album a huge standout for me. Approachable, warm, and yet filled with hard edges.

4 damien jurado

4. Damien Jurado – The Horizon Just Laughed

What good is living if you can’t write your ending?
You’re always in doubt of the truths you’re defending
Seeing yourself in others’ ideas, I’ll write you from somewhere
And call you from later on

~ “The Last Great Washington State”

Damien Jurado is an artist who consistently shows up in my Year-End lists of best music. His songwriting sensibilities, soft, crooning voice, and laconic, gently bouncing tempo put me in a groove that I seldom want to get out of. His latest album, and the first produced without the aid of the late Richard Swift in a number of years, finds Jurado continuing to write short stories to cut his protagonists adrift in. But it’s a pleasure cruise as much as a spiritual journey.

3 soccer mommy

3. Soccer Mommy – Clean

You’re made from the stars
That we watch from your car
And I’m just a victim of changing planets
My Scorpio rising and my parents

~ “Scorpio Rising”

A brand-new artist, to me, in 2018, Soccer Mommy is the solo project of Sophie Allison, currently based in Nashville, TN. Clean is a wistful, sad record that is constantly searching for the twinkle of light emanating from the heavens to chart a course by. Like every other album I’ve chosen for this list, it’s one that is rewards full, repeat listens. Pulling just one song or composition out of the whole seems do diminish the overall effect.

2 beach house

2. Beach House – 7

And I know you like it
So you try to hide it
And I know you like it
So I dive to find it

~ “Dive”

A number of years ago I wrote of Spoon’s album Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga, in essence that, like JS Bach’s Goldberg Variations, they had created a body of work that so fully established their sonic fingerprint as at once recognizable and that seems so blatantly obvious when you hear it, that it almost makes you wonder if they have to try anymore. Repeat listens will reveal that, yes, they do try very hard indeed.

On Beach Houses’s 7th LP, aptly named 7, they’ve attained this same level of mastery. As though an entire planet was just finished being terraformed by only Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally, and now you can go live on it. The production values have gone up, the palette has evolved from a rural hamlet to a glittering metropolis with a full-on nightlife club scene.

1 low

1. Low – Double Negative

Saw you dancing when the fire went out
Before your breathe and barely audible
It’s more of let it out than let it go
It’s not the end it’s just the end of hope

~ “Dancing and Fire”

Low are the last musical act I ever expected to unleash the jangling, sonic avalanche of existential dread that is Double Negative. If ever there was a group whose sound seems to have cut the wagon tracks too deep to leave their path, they’d be it, in my book. Now, it seems to me that there is no group better-suited to deliver the harrowing message this one does.

Alan Sparkhawk & Mimi Parker have here repeatedly torn apart an entire album and then reconstructed it from salvage, eventually delivering the result that falls like the wrath of the gods, a thunderclap, visited with the same sudden violence and irresistible force as the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, blanketing your eardrums like Pompeii. Thoughts wink out, frozen inside your mind under a layer of ash that will preserve their shape for millennia

Double Negative is a harbinger of spiritual cataclysm; invective and paean disassembled to the atomic level and then bashed against each other to create an elemental reaction. Amidst the self-immolating bonfire of ‘christendom,’ Low is conducts the cacophonous orchestra unfolding its Requiem. A shattering achievement.

2018 Albums (a complete-ish list)

  1. The 1975 – A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships
  2. Adrienne Lenker – abysskiss
  3. Adventure Time – Adventure Time: Come Along With Me (Music from the Original TV Series)
  4. A.A.L. (Against All Logic) – 2012-2017
  5. Albert Hammond Jr. – Francis Trouble
  6. Alejandro Escovedo – The Crossing
  7. Alias – Forever is Orchestra
  8. Alias & Doseone – Less is Orchestra
  9. All Them Witches – ATW
  10. Alexandre Desplat – The Shape of Water
  11. Amen Dunes – Freedom
  12. Anenon – Tongue
  13. Arp – ZEBRA
  14. Arctic Monkeys – Tranquility Base Hotel + Casino
  15. Ashley McBryde – Girl Going Nowhere
  16. Beach House – 7
  17. Beacon – Gravity Pairs
  18. The Beths – Future Me Hates Me
  19. Betty LaVette – Things Have Changed
  20. Big Red Machine – Big Red Machine
  21. boygeniuis – boygenius EP
  22. Buffalo Tom – Quiet and Peace
  23. Calexico – The Thread that Keeps Us
  24. Camp Cope – How to Socialise & Make Friends
  25. Carter Burwell – The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
  26. Chaos Chaos – Chaos Chaos
  27. Christina Vantzou – No. 4
  28. Chromatics – Black Walls EP
  29. Chromatics – Blue Girl EP
  30. Chromatics – Camera
  31. Chromatics – Shadow (12 Inch Remixes)
  32. CHVRCHES – Love is Dead
  33. Cloud Nothings – Last Building Burning
  34. Cobra Man – New Driveway Soundtrack
  35. Cocteau Twins – Head Over Heels (Reissue)
  36. Cocteau Twins – Treasure (Reissue)
  37. Connan Mockasin – Jassbusters
  38. Courtney Marie Andrews – May Your Kindness Remain
  39. Damien Jurado – The Horizon Just Laughed
  40. David Byrne – American Utopia
  41. Dead Can Dance – Dionysus
  42. Death Cab for Cutie – Thank You For Today
  43. The Decemberists – I’ll Be Your Girl
  44. Devotchka – This Night Falls Forever
  45. Dirty Projectors – Lamp Lit Prose
  46. David Byrne – American Utopia
  47. Dungen & Woods – Myths 003
  48. Empress Of – Us
  49. Father John Misty – God’s Favorite Customer
  50. Field Report – Summertime Songs
  51. Flasher – Constant Image
  52. Frankel – The Future
  53. Geoff Knorr – Sid Meier’s Civilization VI: Rise & Fall (Original Game Soundtrack)
  54. Geotic – Traversa
  55. Goldfrapp – Silver Eye
  56. Goth Babe – Pacific II – Single
  57. Goth Babe – Point Mugu – EP
  58. Grouper – Grid of Points
  59. The Golden Filter – Still // Alone
  60. Haley Heynderickx – I Need to Start a Garden
  61. Hovvdy – Cranberrys
  62. How to Dress Well – The Anteroom
  63. I’m With Her – See You Around
  64. Janelle Monáe – Dirty Computer
  65. Jeff Tweedy – WARM
  66. Jeffrey Lewis – Works by Tuli Kupferberg (1923-2010)
  67. Jess Williamson – Cosmic Wink
  68. Jim James – Uniform Distortion
  69. Joey Dosik – Inside Voice
  70. Jóhann Jóhannsson – Mandy (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
  71. John Hiatt – The Eclipse Sessions
  72. Jon Hopkins – Singularity
  73. Johnny Jewel – Digital Rain
  74. Johnny Jewel – Themes for Television
  75. Johnny Jewel – Vapor
  76. Jonny Greenwood – Phantom Thread (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
  77. Josh Rouse – Love in the Modern Age
  78. JPEGMAFIA – Veteran
  79. Julia Holter – Aviary
  80. Kacey Musgraves – Golden Hour
  81. Karl Blau – Out Her Space
  82. Kelly Moran – Ultraviolet
  83. Kilchhofer – The Book Room
  84. Kurt Vile – Bottle It In
  85. Lala Lala – The Lamb
  86. The Lemon Twigs – Go to School
  87. Let’s Eat Grandma – I’m All Ears
  88. Lord Huron – Vide Noir
  89. Low – Double Negative
  90. Lucy Dacus – Historian
  91. Lykke Li – so sad so sexy
  92. Max Richter – Sleep
  93. Martyn – Voids
  94. MGMT – Little Dark Age
  95. Mitski – Be the Cowboy
  96. Mount Eerie – Now Only
  97. Mountain Man – Magic Ship
  98. The National – Boxer (Live in Brussels)
  99. Neko Case – Hell On
  100. Nils Frahm – All Melody
  101. Okkervil River – In the Rainbow Rain
  102. Oneohtrix Point Never – Age Of
  103. Oneohtrix Point Never – The Station EP
  104. Oneohtrix Point Never – Love in the Time of Lexapro EP
  105. Ought – Room Inside the World
  106. PAINT – PAINT
  107. Parquet Courts – Wide Awake!
  108. Paul Kelly – Nature
  109. Paul Simon – In the Blue Light
  110. Peggy Gou – Once EP
  111. Phosphorescent – C’est la Vie
  112. Pick a Piper – Distance
  113. Porches – The House
  114. Ramin Djawadi – Westworld: Season 2 
  115. Ramp – Come Into Knowledge (1977)
  116. Rick and Morty – The Rick and Morty Soundtrack
  117. Richard Swift – The Hex
  118. Richard Thompson – 13 Rivers
  119. Robyn – Honey
  120. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – Hope Downs
  121. Roosevelt – Young Romance
  122. S U R V I V E – RR7400: LA041717
  123. S. Carey – Hundred Acres
  124. Say Lou Lou – Immortelle
  125. Sam Evian – Premium
  126. Shame – Songs of Praise
  127. Sigur Rós – Route One
  128. The Shins – Heartworms
  129. sir Was – Digging a Tunnel
  130. Snail Mail – Lush
  131. Soccer Mommy – Clean
  132. SOPHIE – OIL OF EVERY PEARL’S UN-INSIDES
  133. Spirit Award – Muted Crowd
  134. Spirit Fest – Anohito
  135. Spiritualized – And Nothing Hurt
  136. St. Vincent – MassEductation
  137. Stryper – God Damn Evil
  138. Sufjan Stevens – Lonely Man of Winter – Single
  139. Sunflower Bean – Twentytwo in Blue
  140. Superorganism – Superorganisms
  141. System – Plus
  142. Taraval – Aardvark – Single
  143. Thee Oh Sees – Smote Reverser
  144. They Might Be Giants – I Like Fun
  145. Tim Hecker – Konoyo
  146. Thom Yorke – Suspiria (Music from the Luca Guadagnino Film)
  147. Thor Rixson – Songs from the Bath
  148. U.S. Girls – In a Poem Unlimited
  149. Wild Nothing – Indigo
  150. Yo La Tengo – There’s a Riot Going On
  151. Young Fathers – Cocoa Sugar
  152. Yves Tumor – Safe in the Hands of Love
  153. Zola Jesus & Johnny Jewel – Wiseblood (Johnny Jewel Remixes)

Paradox of tolerance

Philosopher Karl Popper defined the paradox in 1945 in The Open Society and Its Enemies Vol. 1 (in note 4 to Chapter 7).

Less well known is the paradox of tolerance: Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. — In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant.

Source: Wikipedia

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre or, Socrates in the Desert

Socratic lessons can be articulated in all manner of ways. Pedro Blas Gonzalez examines John Huston’s 1947 fable about avarice and greed.

This is a story told from the perspective of time and the ironic constitution of the former, as this relates to human existence. What is so daunting about Dobbs’ fate does not seem important, that is, until we attempt to make sense of it. How does Dobbs’ story play out in actual human existence? Because cinema employs a closed-ended logic, that is, a resolution, the viewer is afforded a propaedeutic for future action.

propaedeutic | ˌprōpēˈd(y)o͞odik | formal

adjective: (of an area of study) serving as a preliminary instruction or as an introduction to further study.

noun: an introduction to a subject or area of study.

Via: Senses of Cinema

“The Treasure of the Sierra Madre” – Original 1948 New York Times Review

I just got through watching John Huston’s 1948 adventure film, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, starring Humphrey Bogart and currently sitting at #120 on IMDb’s Top 250 Movies list. A cursory search for commentary on the film turned up the original 1948 review in the N.Y. Times, which ends with a strange sentence.

To the honor of Mr. Huston’s integrity, it should be finally remarked that women have small place in this picture, which is just one more reason why it is good.

Indeed, women barely factor into the 2 hour runtime of the film. Every speaking role is male. The tale is certainly steeped in masculinity, manifesting as naked ambition, paranoia, and a deft commentary on the soul-warping power of greed. Perhaps the reviewer simply thought that the fairer sex were simply too good to be an integral component of a story so bleak, rugged and philosophical. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Via The New York Times

Ten Years on: Alopecia by Why?

Here, we got the razor-sharp lines Wolf had been penning for years focused and condensed into the setting of a band firing on all cylinders, creating a record that’s catchy, memorable, challenging, inventive, playful and very, very dark. All the energy and innovation the Anticon members had shown in their past came together on Alopecia, and it remains just as vital some ten years on.

Source: The Fangasm: Alopecia by Why? / In Depth // Drowned In Sound